made-from-fire
The most important thing in all human relationships is conversation, but people don’t talk anymore, they don’t sit down to talk and listen. They go to the theater, the cinema, watch television, listen to the radio, read books, but they almost never talk. If we want to change the world, we have to go back to a time when warriors would gather around a fire and tell stories.
Paulo Coelho (via beautiful-ambition)
theeweprincess

justlittlethings:

College dorm room idea:

1) Buy a copy of Just Little Things (they’re super cheap on Amazon).

2) Tear out the pages (you’ll feel awful but just do it) and trim the edges (optional).

3) Pin the pages up on your wall using thumbtacks, tape them up, hang them up with clothespins and yarn, or whatever you wish!

You’ll have a colorful wall full of all things happy! The pictures above are a few pages from the actual book, so just imagine a wall with 200+ more. :)

Some fans have made something similar (here), but with the book, you won’t have to spend the time/money printing or writing everything out.

Let me know if you like this idea! If you end up doing this, send me photos if you can! I’d love to see them. :)

kofibansa

facelesstiger:

thetrillestqueen:

christhepusher:

cmykaffir:

3 Ways to Speak English.

Jamila Lyiscott is a “tri-tongued orator;” in her powerful spoken-word essay “Broken English,” she celebrates — and challenges — the three distinct flavors of English she speaks with her friends, in the classroom and with her parents. As she explores the complicated history and present-day identity that each language represents, she unpacks what it means to be “articulate.”

YoOoOo!!!!

ayeeeeeeeeeeee gal

Shit got real

kofibansa

Anonymous asked:

recipe for apapransa

ourafrica answered:

Ingredients:

  1. palm nut soup
  2. red kidney beans
  3. crabs for garnishing
  4. any fish or meat you wanna use in the soup
  5. roasted maize flour; or kyekyere
  6. salt
  7. Banku Ta or a wooden laddle.

Method:

The palmnut soup is the only liquid you are going to cook this dish with so take note.


Scoop a few laddles of the finished palmnut soup into the saucepan you are going to cook the Aprans in and bring to a boil.
In the meantime the rest of the soup should be on the side hot and simmering. Cold soup will spoil the dish.
Now pour a reasonable amount of the roasted corn powder into the sauce pan and stir as you would do with akple or banku.

The rest of the palm nut soup is what you would substitute for water till the apras is done.

A well cooked one should be very moist and pliable so give it some good cooking time and turning plus loads of palmnut soup.

For serving, scoop it into a square or round bowl and smoothen the top, then turn it onto a plate. Garnish it with the crabs and some of the kidney beans.
The meat and some of the kidney beans will be entrenched in the mixture and makes for nice discovery.
Eat it hot or cold. I like mine cold and sliced into wedges. But some people like it moist and hot; straight from the sauce pan. Add some of the soup to it if you want.

kofibansa:

It’s been a long while since I last had this dish. This was a favorite of mine all through my Accra Aca days. These days my tastes have changed a bit, probably because I am very far away from home, away from my mom’s good food and my other favorites ; banku, jollof rice and fufu (not the powered kind). I better stop writing now before i get homesick again. 😢😢😢

kofibansa

stay-human:

I cannot recommend this video enough. This woman breaks it down perfectly.

The Stories That Europe Tells Itself About Its Colonial History

by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

“She said once she was shocked that her son while being taught Belgian history, was taught nothing about Congo. She said “They teach my son in school that he must help the poor Africans, but they don’t teach him about what Belgium did in Congo.” Of course, all countries are evasive about the past for which they feel ashamed, but I was shocked by what seemed to me not evasiveness but an erasure of history

If her son doesn’t learn that the modern Congo State began a hundred years ago as the personal property of a Belgian king, who was desperate to get wealthy from ivory and rubber, if her son doesn’t learn that the hands of Congolese people were chopped off for not producing enough resources to meet the king’s greed, if her son doesn’t learn that the Belgian government later led Congo with a deliberate emphasis on not producing an educated class, so that Congolese could become clerks and mechanics but couldn’t go to university, if her son doesn’t learn that more recently, even though it was the Americans who installed the Mobutu dictatorship, Belgium was a major force behind the scenes propping him up, if this young Belgian boy, knows nothing about these incidents, then, at some point, they would perhaps no longer have happened because the past after all is the past because we collectively acknowledged that it is so. 

This young Belgian boy would grow up to see Africa only as a place that requires his aid, his help, his charity with no complications for him. A place that can help him show how compassionate he can be, and most of all, a place whose present has no connection to Europe. 

It is not that Europe has denied its colonial history. Instead, Europe has developed a way of telling the story of its colonial history that ultimately seeks to erase that history”